Collection: PDP

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Rudolf Laban

Rudolf Laban, who defined this concept as “space which can be reached by easily extended limbs” created the concept of the Kinesphere. This concept if very widely used worldwide, and is described as “gestural space” and “zones of reach”

Kinesphere and personal space:

The kinesphere, is often referred to “personal space” and both are considered virtually synonymous. Various social and emotional affects are sometimes ascribed to the kinesphere:

- “the space surrounding each person which belongs to him” (Preston-Dunlop, 1984, p. viii), 
- “the space I sense as mine” which can expand or shrink with one’s mood (Hackney, 1990), 
- the space which is “psychologically their personal ‘property’” (Hutchinson-Guest, 1983, p. 310), or
- the “psychological kinesphere” which relates to “how far one projects one’s effort life into space” (Schick, 1990).

‘Personal Space’ has various different interpretations – it has social and emotional connotations, which go deeper than the purely kinaesthetic concept of the kinespere. Personal space often refers to subjective feelings as well, feelings of ownership, bodily territory. 

"There is an intrinsic relationship between the emotional/social significance of space and the perceptual-motor actions within space, however these can also be distinguished:

[The kinesphere] is related to the concept of ‘personal space’ referred to in interpersonal communication studies, and to ‘body image boundary’ referred to in body image studies, and to ‘territory’ referred to in sociological studies of communication. [But] The kinesphere differs from [these] other conceptions of the space surrounding the body by the fact that any organisation of that space is undertaken with reference to the movements that the body makes within it. "
http://www.laban-analyses.org/laban_analysis_reviews/laban_analysis_notation/space_harmony_choreutics/kinesphere_scaffolding/polyhedra.htm

 

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Debra Landis 

Bowhouse 

Rebecca Wornsworth 

Paddy Hartley 

Una Burke 

Rebecca Horn 

Maria Blasse 

Leigh Bowery 

Rudolf Ladan 

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Paddy Hartley 

Hartley is most famous for his facial corsetry. He was commissioned by the V&A for his facial corsets. They are designed to brutally mimic the results of cosmetic surgery procedures and beyond. I find it really interesting the way in which he focuses on certain aspects of the face.

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